Kimzey heads into August optimistic, atop standings

It’s beginning to seem that there is very little that will rattle rookie bull rider Sage Kimzey, despite his age.

A four-time world champion closes the gap on him in the world standings? His arm gets sore again after a bunch of rides in a short time and he has to take a break?

No worries, Kimzey is taking it all in stride.

The 19-year-old from Strong City, Okla., leads the PRCA World Standings heading into August after a solid check at the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days pushed him past $100,000 in season earnings. He finished fourth at the famed rodeo, a feat that put a smile on his face.

“Any time you can go to ‘The Daddy of ‘em All,’ make the short round and win some money, it’s dang sure an accomplishment,” Kimzey said. “I got on some really good bulls there, was lucky enough to make the short round and did my job in the short round.”

A check for $4,308 at the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days helped Sage Kimzey cross the $100,000 mark in season earnings.  --Photo courtesy of Fred McClanahan Jr.

A check for $4,308 for finishing fourth at the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days helped Sage Kimzey cross the $100,000 mark in season earnings. –Photo courtesy of Fred McClanahan Jr.

He took a check home worth $4,308 from Cheyenne and pushed his season total to $101,184. Kimzey is just $11,906 shy of Steve Woolsey’s rookie record for pre-Wrangler National Finals Rodeo earnings, and eclipsing that on his way to Las Vegas would be a feather in his hat.

“It’s awesome to cross the $100,000 mark, and it’s pretty much the gold standard, as far as money won before the NFR,” Kimzey said. “So, crossing that before the beginning of August is pretty cool and a pretty good experience. (Beating Woolsey’s record) is a small goal and is something that would be cool to achieve, but it’s not something I’ve really been dwelling on.

“Having the most money won in the regular season as a rookie is always a great accomplishment.”

Four-time World Champion J.W. Harris has had a big few months and cut Kimzey’s lead to just $7,408 heading into this week. Trey Benton III is also in the mix with $87,652 as well, but Kimzey isn’t stressing too much about standings at this point of the season.

“You can’t worry about it at this time of the year,” he said. “There’s so much money going back and forth between the top guys, and any of the top guys are capable of having a $20,000 or $30,000 week. Those guys are phenomenal bull riders, but you can’t keep looking at the standings.

“I’ve just got to keep staying on my bulls.”

Sage Kimzey

Sage Kimzey

Kimzey left Cheyenne with a sore riding arm, so he’s decided to take some time off to rest and recuperate before hitting the road full-time again.

“I got on eight head in two days, so I was a little sored up,” Kimzey said. “So, I took a four-day doctor’s release and turned out of Spanish Fork, Salt Lake, Ogden and Eagle. That little break has really helped me, and I feel rejuvenated and ready to finish out the year.

“It’s really hard to take the time off that you need to – especially this time of year – but it’s also a lot easier to win when you’re feeling 100 percent healthy. It’s a fine line you have to walk, but last week I was at the point to where I felt like it was going to hurt getting on (a bull) and I wasn’t going to be enjoying what I was doing.”

The talented teen has also continued his stellar run in his home state, winning the Woodward Elks Rodeo in mid-July with an 83-pointer on Powder River Rodeo’s Tee Time. Kimzey has enjoyed riding in Oklahoma this year.

“It’s always great to get to ride so close to the house at a rodeo like Woodward that has so much history and prestige behind it,” said Kimzey, who has also won in Guymon, Tulsa, Duncan and Claremore this year. “I feel comfortable at (Oklahoma rodeos), and I’ve also drawn really well at them this year for some reason. It’s been a good year in my home state, that’s for sure.”

If he keeps riding the way he has been, Kimzey could have a good chance to take a gold buckle back home to the Sooner State come December.

This is the fourth in a series of monthly articles featuring rookie bull rider Sage Kimzey and his path toward the Wrangler NFR. Each month, NFR Insider Neal Reid will catch up with Kimzey to talk about his progress, successes and setbacks as the rodeo season marches on. Stay tuned for more about Kimzey.

Murray: Seventh all-around title was dream come true

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of guest columns that will be featured on the NFR Insider page on NFRExperience.com from time to time leading up to December’s Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. Seven-time World Champion All-Around Cowboy Ty Murray is a ProRodeo Hall of Famer, a member of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum Hall of Fame, a Professional Bull Riders’ Board of Directors adviser and one of the most popular cowboys in the history of ProRodeo. Here, he gives exclusive insight into his experience while winning his record-setting seventh all-around gold buckle in 1998.

BY TY MURRAY

My goal from the time I was a little kid was to win more all-around world championships than Larry Mahan.

I don’t even remember when I thought of that, it was so long ago. I was a little kid.

I won six in a row up through 1994, and I was injured and out with surgeries in 1995, 1996 and 1997. In that timeframe, I had both knees done and both shoulders done. I was out in 1995 with my knees and thought I’d be back in 1996. I was out with a shoulder injury in 1996 and thought I’d come back in 1997. Then, I was out in 1997 with the other shoulder.

One of the all-time legends of ProRodeo, Ty Murray (second from left) usually keeps good company while in Las Vegas.  --Las Vegas Events photo

One of the all-time legends of ProRodeo, Ty Murray (second from left) usually keeps good company while in Las Vegas. Here, he is pictured with (from left to right) Fred Whitfield, a cardboard Tuf Cooper, Charmayne James, Billy Etbauer and Lewis Feild.  –Las Vegas Events photo

So, I hired a guy by the name of Jesse Marquez, who was a four-time national champion in the martial arts form of Nippon Kempo, and I started training with him. I started training really, really hard, and I was doing a couple thousand sit-ups a day. It was that sort of training. It wasn’t like if you go to 24-Hour Fitness and hire a trainer. I’m talking about training six days a week for four or five hours a day and getting after it.

Physically, it was really hard, but you get to a point where you can’t get tired. Once I got in shape, I could do 4,000 sit-ups a day if you wanted me to. We could go in there and do a two-and-a-half-hour training session and go as hard as we could go, and when it was over, I felt like I could do anything.

For the first month of training though, I remember I threw up almost every day. I would get home, and I had this rock floor in my living room, and I would just go and lay on that rock floor for 30 or 45 minutes thinking I was going to die.

I had stayed in riding shape my whole life, and I had trained ever since the seventh grade. When I missed that first year, it was the first time in my life when I wasn’t riding. I rehabbed my knees six days a week, and when I went back, I was in shape, but my body wasn’t in riding shape the way it had been.

Then, I dislocated my shoulder and did all the rehab work again, came back and dislocated the other shoulder. That’s when I realized I had to get my body back to game shape, and that’s when I started training really, really hard. When I came back in 1998, I was in the best shape of my life.

Ty Murray worked hard to return from injuries and was dialed in and focused in 1998.  --PRCA photo by Mike Copeman

Ty Murray worked hard to return from injuries and was dialed in and focused in 1998. –PRCA photo by Mike Copeman

I think somebody from the ProRodeo Sports News told me one time that I entered 54 rodeos in the bull riding that year and got a check at about 51 of them. Bulls couldn’t do to me what they could have done to me before, because of the shape I got in.

When you’ve wanted something so bad for a lifetime, you’ll do anything it takes to get there, and I think that’s where the desire to do all of that training came from.

When I was hurt, I remember I started getting a little nervous about my chances to set the record, and I had sponsors that were letting go of me. I think people were starting to think, ‘He’s not going to be able to come back and compete at the level he did,’ and I don’t blame them. I think if I had been a bystander or a fan watching, I no doubt would have thought the same thing.

But I felt good in 1998, and when I got to the Finals, I felt like I was at that place all athletes want to be, where you’re in great shape, you still have people on your side and you also have experience on your side. It is the intersection of youth, great shape and experience, and I think that’s when athletes do their best.

What I mean by experience is, I think I was at a point and a place where I knew how to enjoy the process. I knew how to enjoy the journey, and I knew how to overcome the nerves and pressure. It’s pressure you put on yourself, because when you’ve been dreaming of something since you were born, that can be a very pressure-filled situation.

At that point of my career, I felt like I knew how to control my emotions and control my brain and could remember that the journey was what it was really all about. I settled into it, and I felt like I enjoyed that Finals.

Over my seven all-arounds, I got to see every side of the coin. I got to see years where they couldn’t catch me and I had it sewn up before the NFR ever started, I had years where I had to battle for it, and for my first all-around title, I battled my uncle, Butch Myers.

I knew the kind of Finals Herbert Theriot was having, and Herbert was a great cowboy. He was a very special all-around hand. We were trading the lead back and forth and battling, and I think that’s where my experience helped me. It helped me settle in and get to the place I was at when I crawled down into that chute on the last bull.

It was tough, and there were several bulls that bucked me off that shouldn’t have, and that Finals didn’t go my way every night. It sounds cheesy to say, but being a champion is about how you get back up off the ground and how you’re able to turn those sort of things around. When I watch football on TV, the greatest thing to me is when you see Peyton Manning come back from when it’s 24-0, and that’s what I enjoy about sports.

That’s when you see the mark of a real champion and a real competitor. That’s true in life, too. I think you see a person’s character when things get tough.

I don’t know what the actual numbers were, but as far as I knew, when I was crawling on that last bull, I had to ride that last bull. That’s a moment you can look at two ways. You can look at it like that’s the moment you’ve dreamed of your whole life, or you can look at it like that’s the most pressure-filled situation of your life and you can choke and puke all over yourself.

I had a real sense of calm come over me when I climbed down in the chute on that 10th bull, Harper & Morgan Rodeo’s Hard Copy, and he was a big, dangerous bull. He was a bull that weighed about 2,200 pounds, and I’d seen him jerk some guys down and knock their heads off. I saw him stick a horn in Chris Shivers’ mouth.

I just remember when I got down in that chute, I knew I had to ride him. It felt like home when I climbed down into that chute. I was in a comfortable place where I needed to be, and I knew what I had to do. I’d spent my whole life doing it and had done it 6,000 times, and I was ready for that moment.

When the whistle blew, I knew I was the seven-time all-around world champion, and I jumped off that bull and put my hands above my head. That was the moment I’d spent a lifetime working toward.

It was an unbelievable moment for me. It was reaching a benchmark that I’d set for myself and had been working toward for a lifetime.

Winning his record seventh all-around gold buckle was a dream come true for Ty Murray, who had set his sights on Larry Mahan's and Tom Ferguson's record at an early age.  --PRCA photo by Mike Copeman

Winning his record seventh all-around gold buckle was a dream come true for Ty Murray, who had set his sights on Larry Mahan’s and Tom Ferguson’s record at an early age. –PRCA photo by Mike Copeman

I think what makes things different for a professional athlete is, you see people reach success in a lot of different fields, but there’s not a defining moment where there’s 20,000 people giving you a standing ovation. If you want to set out to become the world’s best brain surgeon, it doesn’t come from a single, defining moment like that.

That was something I always remembered. That was THE moment I’d waited and worked for my entire life.

It felt like it sunk in right away. I walked out of the arena, and Larry Mahan was the first person that shook my hand. It felt great, and it felt like a relief.

Cody Lambert was my lifelong partner, and we’re best friends to this day. He’d entered me in rodeos that whole year, and that’s the kind of friend he is. As soon as the Finals was over, he was the first person I called, and that was a real special moment for both of us because it was really a team effort. He was the one I’d traveled with since I was a rookie, and he’d put a lot of work into me getting to that point as well. That was a real nice phone call.

Having your family around in those moments is a big deal, because they know full well how much work and how many years had gone into that. They had made a lot of sacrifices as well, my mom, my dad and both sisters, for me to get to that point.

It felt like a lot of blood, sweat, tears and crashes, and I’m not saying that to be clichéd. When you’re a three-event roughstock rider, there is a lot of blood, sweat and tears. There’s a lot of chances to quit.

To come out of that arena and have my all-time hero shake my hand for eclipsing his record, that was a pretty special moment. That’s a big part of the reason I wanted to be there for Trevor Brazile in 2010, because I know what it feels like spending your whole life working that hard toward something.

I was probably 40 years old when I finally got to meet Tom Ferguson, and I felt just like a little kid. It was great, because I spent a lot of time looking up to him and Larry as a kid. He was real proud of me, and it was a great feeling. Even though we’d never met, it was like we’d known each other a long time, and we just took to each other right off the bat.

If you look at Jim Shoulders, me, Larry, Tom, Trevor and Phil Lyne, when you look at guys who’ve done big things or broken records in the sport, it’s almost like we have an unspoken brotherhood. It’s because we spent a lifetime doing the same thing, and we know how much practice and work and how many miles and guts and grit it takes.

Las Vegas has always been a special place for Ty Murray, shown here with legendary gambler Amarillo Slim, right.

Las Vegas has always been a special place for Ty Murray, shown here with legendary gambler Amarillo Slim, right.

Larry was a supporter of mine since I was a 13-year-old kid, and I’ve known him and looked up to him my whole life. Still, to this day, we still have a special friendship.

That ride in Round 10 was nowhere close to the best bull ride I ever made or the best bull I ever got on. I felt fine about the way I rode him, but I’d been on a lot better bulls, had a lot higher scores and made a lot better rides. But I’ll remember that ride forever.

I can remember everything about it. I can remember the smell of the air, everything. That whole ride, that whole experience – from my behind-the-chutes warm-up to climbing in the chute, when the gate opened and what was going through my mind – I remember every single thing about it.

I felt like I had the perfect seat, was in perfect shape, had the perfect timing and rhythm, and I knew I could ride him from the second jump. I remember thinking about the second jump that I couldn’t have been blown off that bull with a cannon.

Murray scored 79 points on Hard Copy to split fifth place in the 10th round and clinch the NFR bull riding average title and bull riding gold buckle. In the process, he staved off Theriot’s rally and won his seventh all-around crown with $264,673 to Theriot’s $228,561, passing Mahan and Ferguson, who had six apiece. It would be 12 years before Brazile eclipsed Murray’s all-around record.

Cowboy Christmas huge for cowboys with Wrangler NFR dreams

Heading into this year’s Cowboy Christmas, Nick Guy was, well…just another guy.

The bulldogger from Sparta, Wis., had won some checks, but was nowhere near the coveted Top 15 in the PRCA World Standings. That all changed in a hurry the week leading up to the Fourth of July.

Guy, who qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in 2010, got tapped off and finished Cowboy Christmas as the bulldogger with the biggest haul. The 6-3, 245-pounder pocketed $9,345 for winning the average in St. Paul, Ore., and added big checks in Molalla, Ore., Cody, Wyo., and Red Lodge, Mont., for a $22,209 total.

Nick Guy

Nick Guy

That catapulted the 29-year-old from 44th to fifth in the standings with $35,338 heading into mid-July and put a big smile on the affable bulldogger’s face.

“I’ve always wanted to have a week like that, and a guy dreams of having a $20,000 week over the Fourth of July,” said Guy, who finished 17th in the world last year to narrowly miss a trip to Las Vegas. “For a lot of guys, that doesn’t happen, and there are just very few guys who can get on a roll like that. This year, it happened for me.

“I was just due for a big week like that. I knew I had the ability and I knew the horse had the ability, and I’m just glad it all came together.”

Guy, who finished 21st in the world in 2012, said the key to his success was a talented four-legged athlete named Roany. Owned by his traveling partner and hazer Cody Kroul, Roany has given Guy a consistent and quality mount he feels supremely confident aboard when he backs in the box.

“He just gives me the same trip every time,” Guy said of the horse. “He doesn’t run wide, he doesn’t run too tight and just gives me the same trip every time. In the bulldogging, that’s important.

“Over the Fourth, I got a great start wherever I went and he caught up (to the steers) quick, and when that happens, I’ve just got to do my job. I’m definitely feeling pretty good about it.”

Near-misses from the past two seasons have left Guy hungry for a return trip to the Thomas & Mack Center.

“After you’re there once competing, it’s really hard to watch from home, because I bulldog with those guys all year long and feel like I can bulldog with the best of them,” Guy said. “To have a big week like this is huge. My ultimate goal this year was not having to be sitting on the couch in December.”

The monster Cowboy Christmas pay day took a heap of pressure off Guy’s shoulders, and now he can focus on the task at hand without having to obsess about the standings.

“The last few years, it’s felt like all summer long all I’ve been doing is chasing the Top 15, where you’re almost having to win twice as much as everyone else just to catch up,” he said. “Now, I’m in the Top 15, I’ve got quite a bit of money won and I’ve got a lot of rodeos left to go to. I feel like I can just keep plugging away, and I feel like I’m in a good spot.

“I don’t feel like I’ve got the Finals made by any means, but I’m in the position now where, if I just keep doing what I’m doing, keep my head down and keep bulldogging good and the horse keeps working good, I feel like I can make it back to the Finals.”

Nick Guy qualified for the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, ultimately finishing 12th in the world.  --PRCA ProRodeo photo by Mike Copeman

Nick Guy qualified for the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, ultimately finishing 12th in the world.               –PRCA ProRodeo photo by Mike Copeman

Guy heads into the final 12 weeks of the season confident, focused and excited.

“Once you start winning, it’s almost like a snowball effect and you’ve got that confidence,” he said. “Every time I back in the box, I feel like I’m going to go win something or make a good run. I’m never second-guessing myself anymore. I’m just going, letting it happen and am not trying to make it happen anymore.

“Over the Fourth, I didn’t try too hard, and it just happened. Sometimes, when you’re trying too hard is when things don’t work out. I just let it come as it did, and I was awfully excited to have it happen.”

Second-year tie-down roper Marty Yates can relate. The Stephenville, Texas, cowboy put together a stellar Cowboy Christmas of his own, raking in $20,978 to move to fourth in the world standings.

Before then, he’d been on the outside looking in, itching for a big check that would give him a chance at his first Wrangler NFR qualification. Yates won multiple substantial checks over the Fourth of July run, including $8,926 from St. Paul, Ore., and $4,253 from Livingston, Mont.

Marty Yates

Marty Yates

It was a huge week for the 20-year-old.

“Oh man, it was awesome,” said Yates, who celebrated his birthday on July 6. “It got me right where I needed to be, and I’m on the cruising track to my first NFR. I’d like to get things finished off and see how far (up) I can be in (the standings) when Vegas comes around.”

Yates now has $51,128 in season earnings thanks to his Cowboy Christmas haul, and he gave credit to his 7-year-old gelding, Chicken, for the big week.

“I can’t say enough about my horse this year,” he said. “I had zero confidence in the horse I had last year, so it was 100 percent different. This year, this little horse, we’ve come a long way together, and it’s been amazing.”

Yates finished third in the Resistol Rookie of the Year standings last year and viewed the season as a disappointment.

“Last year, my rookie year, I didn’t have a very good year,” he said. “It was pretty rough on me, but I think it was a good stepping stone and learning year for me. It taught me a lot.”

The windfall over the Fourth will allow Yates to fine-tune his traveling schedule for the remainder of the season, which ends Sept. 30.

“I won’t go to as many (rodeos) and will just concentrate on going to the big ones,” Yates said. “I won’t enter up too much and will take care of my horse to try and make him last longer.”

If a Wrangler NFR qualification is in the cards for the young talent, Yates will be realizing a dream by punching his ticket to Las Vegas.

“My whole life, it’s all been about making it to the NFR,” he said. “It’d mean the world, and it’s what I’ve been waiting for my whole life. That’s what it’s all about!”

A stock contracting success story

The job of a PRCA stock contractor is a difficult one, with 1,000 moving pieces to a business that is often thankless and downright hard.

From buying, breeding and raising stock to producing rodeos and managing a large staff of workers, the duties of a contractor are numerous and varied. It can be a tough way to make a living, but the business is a labor of love they wouldn’t trade for anything.

That’s what I found while going behind the scenes at Pete Carr’s operation in Athens, Texas, just outside Dallas. Carr owns and operates Pete Carr Pro Rodeo and Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo – which he bought from good friend Scotty Lovelace in 2013 – providing stock to more than 40 rodeos each year.

Pete Carr runs his stock contracting operation from his 900-acre ranch in Athens, Texas, outside Dallas.

Pete Carr runs his stock contracting operation from his 900-acre ranch in Athens, Texas, outside Dallas.

All told, Carr has nearly 50 bulls and 300 horses in his rotation, rearing and cultivating them on a cozy 900-acre ranch. From there, the talented buckers and roughly 60 steers are hauled to rodeos throughout Texas and across the country, where they routinely perform at high levels and help contestants frequent the pay window.

More than 300 horses are part of Pete Carr's pen, and new generations of buckers are being born every year.

More than 300 horses are part of Pete Carr’s pen, and new generations of buckers are being born every year.

It is a highly successful business Carr has built through the years from meager beginnings, when he and Lovelace were just trying to make it in the competitive world of stock contracting and working to buy their PRCA cards.

“I wanted to stay involved (in rodeo), so I started buying animals,” Carr said at the Parker County Frontier Days Pro Rodeo in Weatherford, Texas, in mid-June. “We were hardworking, blue-collar dudes. It was fun for me to stay involved, help him and help his company.”

Pete Carr's staff takes good care of his animals, who always know when it's feeding time.

Pete Carr’s staff takes good care of his animals, who always know when it’s feeding time.

Carr is no stranger to success, having built his general contracting construction company, Resource Commercial, into a healthy and profitable business the last 20 years. It was a slow and methodical process to do the same with his stock contracting exploits.

Carr rode barebacks in high school and competed at amateur rodeos in the early 1990s. That’s where he and Lovelace forged a friendship that blossomed and served as the foundation for the stock contracting successes they’ve enjoyed.

One can certainly enjoy the beauty of a Texas ranch while visiting Pete Carr's property.

One can certainly enjoy the beauty of a Texas ranch while visiting Pete Carr’s property.

After he quit riding in 1993, Carr partnered with Lovelace to produce pro rodeos, and they were off and running. In 2004, Carr bought James Harper’s operation, and it was called Harper, Morgan & Carr, with Lovelace working as the general manager and 10-time PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year Stace Smith helping out as a pickup man and filling other duties.

They hired Rory Lemmel to take over as GM, and Carr bought the Walls’ rodeo company, further expanding his reach in the industry. One of the group’s horses, Real Deal, won PRCA Bareback Horse of the Year in 2005, and Carr and Lovelace had become regulars at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Pete Carr has nearly 50 bulls in his talented pen.

Pete Carr has nearly 50 bulls in his talented pen.

Fast-forward to 2013, when Lovelace sold the business to Carr, and he has worked diligently to make sure the momentum they created together continues for years to come. In 2013, no contractor had more animals bucking at the Wrangler NFR than Carr’s outfits.

“It took a long time to get this deal done,” Carr said. “Whenever you make that kind of acquisition, there’s always some hills and valleys, but for the most part, it’s been good.”

Line Man is one of Pete Carr's top bulls, of which he has many.

Line Man is one of Pete Carr’s top bulls, of which he has many.

The process to get Carr where he is today has been a long, protracted one, but has allowed him to learn everything he needed to know about the rodeo contracting and production business.

“I had such an education coming up, and I went to Scotty’s rodeos before I even quit riding,” Carr said. “Then, when we did the Harper deal, I got a PhD in promotions, putting on a rodeo, production, how to make money and what sells – from cotton candy, to weezers to t-shirts.

“When I bought the Walls’ deal, it was pretty easy, and when I bought Scotty’s deal, I had enough understanding of everything that there wasn’t any question I knew what I was getting into.”

He is grateful to have had the chance to gain invaluable experience that way.

“It’s been good for me to kind of build things,” he said. “I didn’t just jump out there and get thrown in the grease, got my butt kicked and went limping back home. I’ve been fortunate enough to bite off as much as I want that worked for me, and when I was able I could do this. I’m really having a good time.”

Working in the rodeo business and dealing with genuine, dedicated people, Carr says, is the most rewarding aspect of what he does.

“I’m a people person, so it’s definitely the people,” Carr said. “I like interacting with the committees, the contestants, the local media or whoever. Everybody who’s here wants to be here, and they’ve all made a conscious decision to be here. Nobody’s stuck in a position, and everybody’s excited about being here.

“I like being around positive people, so that’s good.”

Pete Carr provides stock to more than 40 rodeos a year, and he's set his sights on continuing to grow his business.

Pete Carr provides stock to more than 40 rodeos a year, and he’s set his sights on continuing to grow his business.

The business has also enabled Carr to become involved in a number of charity initiatives, and being able to give back is something that also gives him joy.

“We had a big exceptional rodeo here last night, and there was 91 kids out there,” Carr said in Weatherford. “It was just phenomenal. It’s good to be able to interact with those kids.

“That makes you feel good about what you’re doing. You have a purpose and a direction, and there’s a reason why you’re here.”

He also loves watching his animals buck, especially at the Wrangler NFR.

“That’s pretty cool,” he said. “You watch them grow up, and they’re kind of like your kids. It’s kind of like being at a football or soccer game watching your kids, and when they do well, your chest gets pretty square.”

And when they win a round in Las Vegas, it’s an exhilarating thrill. Carr is grounded enough to realize that luck also plays a role in success at that level.

“That’s luck, because there are so many great animals there,” he said. “The right guy has to have the right stock, and they’ve got to click. Some years, we’ve done real well, and some years, it makes you appreciate getting (the round buckles).”

Pete Carr enjoys interacting with contestants, committees and everyone involved in the business most of all.

Pete Carr enjoys interacting with contestants, committees and everyone involved in the business most of all.

Carr knows success can be fleeting, so he enjoys it as much as possible.

“You’ve got to work at it, and I don’t take anything for granted, because it can be gone just like that and things can go South in a hurry,” he said. “So, I just appreciate what I have and what I’ve been given and try to make the most of it.”

Carr’s dedication to excellence is what drives him, and he has big goals for growing his business in the future. It all comes from his mother, Jimmie, who lost a battle with cancer in 2010.

“It’s just a work ethic that my mother instilled in me from watching her get up and work two or three jobs,” he said. “She’s always up there pushing me.”

Halfway through year, Kimzey staying focused and fresh

Leading the world standings can be a daunting and tiresome task, but teenage bull rider Sage Kimzey seems poised and at ease with the challenge.

Kimzey was relaxed and content while talking about his season on a rare day off on Tuesday. He was with traveling partners enjoying the beauty of Yellowstone National Park after riding in the Cody-Yellowstone (Wyo.) Xtreme Bulls stop on Monday night.

Sage Kimzey

Sage Kimzey

He didn’t have any luck there, but feels good about how his season has progressed.

“It’s still been good coming into the summer run,” said Kimzey, who led the world standings with $86,881 through June.

Kimzey took a week off from pro rodeos to compete in the College National Finals Rodeo, June 15-21, where he finished second to Joe Frost of Oklahoma Panhandle State University. Sometimes it’s easy to forget Kimzey is a 19-year-old college kid who’s still taking classes at Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

His stellar season has continued in the past month-and-a-half, and Kimzey has picked up some solid checks along the way. A 91-pointer on Four L & Diamond S Rodeo’s bull Highway at the Southwestern International PRCA Rodeo in El Paso, Texas, in early June netted him a winner’s check for $2,623, and he pocketed another $2,589 for tying for second at the Redding (Calif.) Rodeo in mid-May.

“That bull is really good, and I’ve seen him a couple times,” Kimzey said of Highway. “He’s just one of those good bulls (you want).”

Sage Kimzey won El Paso with this 91-point ride on Four L & Diamond S Rodeo's Highway in early June to keep his 2014 season rolling along.  --Photo courtesy of dudleydoright.com

Sage Kimzey won El Paso with this 91-point ride on Four L & Diamond S Rodeo’s Highway in early June to keep his 2014 season rolling along. –Photo courtesy of dudleydoright.com

Since then, he took some time off to rest a sore riding arm and then went to nod his head at the collegiate crescendo.

“I’ve only been to three pro rodeos in the last three weeks,” Kimzey said. “You can get a little run down when you’re getting on as many as I am, that’s for sure. I’m just getting healthy for the summer run and making sure everything’s perfect.

“Everything’s back to normal and back to healthy.”

The rest has done him well, and Kimzey is ready for a busy Fourth of July run for Cowboy Christmas.

“It isn’t crazy, but it’s pretty busy,” Kimzey said of his travel schedule. “I’ll go to St. Paul, Livingston, Red Lodge, Cody, Prescott and Belle Fourche. It’s not crazy, but it’s not calm either, that’s for sure.”

Even though he’s atop the world standings, the temptation to take it easy and go to only the big rodeos is one that Kimzey has not let deter him from his overall plan. He still expects to compete hard and often in the coming months as he builds his bank account.

“I’ll try to find a real good middle point of keeping my body healthy, but also getting on a lot of bulls to win as much money as possible,” said Kimzey, who led four-time World Champion J.W. Harris by $17,179 heading into July. “I’ll just try to find some common ground there and balance it out, and we’ll see where it comes.

“One of the reasons I’m successful is that I ride a high percentage of them, and it’s not that I’ve got the flashiest style or anything. I’m going to go to as many (rodeos) as possible. I’m not going to do the Cody Ohl thing and just go to 40 rodeos, that’s pretty special what he does.”

Sage Kimzey has no doubt made his father, Ted, a two-time Wrangler NFR barrel man, a proud papa this year.

Sage Kimzey has no doubt made his father, Ted, a two-time Wrangler NFR barrel man, a proud papa this year.

Considering Kimzey is still a hungry teen riding the crest of a great and powerful wave this season, it should come as no surprise that he’s raring to go hard in July and August. That hunger – not to mention raw talent – is what has gotten him to the top, and he’s bound and determined to stay there for the foreseeable future.

This is the third in a series of monthly articles featuring Sage Kimzey and his path toward the Wrangler NFR. Each month, NFR Insider Neal Reid will catch up with Kimzey to talk about his progress, successes and setbacks as the rodeo season marches on. Stay tuned for more about Kimzey.

Patriotism a common theme in ProRodeo

A person would be hard pressed to find a more patriotic group than the world of ProRodeo.

From fans, contestants and personnel, to sponsors, administration and organizers, patriotism runs strong through the Western world and the professional rodeo industry. Whether it’s an impassioned national anthem, a tribute to the military or a remembrance of those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice to protect our country’s freedoms, ProRodeo does it right when it comes to patriotic displays.

I was thinking about that during the Memorial Day weekend, and I didn’t have to rack my memory hard at all to find several examples of patriotism in ProRodeo. There are poignant examples just from the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo alone.

Each year, Wrangler pays tribute to the U.S. Armed Forces on Wrangler Night by announcing donations to the Wrangler National Patriot Program. This program – which raises money year-round for soldiers and their families – was founded in 2009 and began with a $50,000 donation in the name of the late Jim Shoulders.

More than $750,000 has been donated so far, with portions of proceeds from the sale of Wrangler National Patriot shirts going to the program. Wrangler has encouraged PRCA rodeo committees to reach out to their local service men and women with their own charity initiatives, and dozens of them have stepped up to do so.

Stage Coach (13)

Each year on Wrangler Night at the Wrangler NFR, the company presents a check representing the total donations made to the Wrangler National Patriot program from that year. –PRCA photo by Greg Westfall

“We have a high level of pride and respect for the individuals serving in the U.S. military who show heroism every day in an effort to protect our country. This is our chance to give back to those veterans who have suffered injuries fighting for our country’s safety and freedom, and to their families who have lost a loved one while on duty,” Phil McAdams, president, Wrangler Specialty Apparel, said on the program’s website. “It is a cause we believe will resonate with the Western industry and rodeo community in particular, and one they will get behind with sincerity.”

This December, Wrangler NFR fans can look forward to military tributes on Boyd Gaming Night on Wednesday, Dec. 10, and on Wrangler National Patriot Night on the rodeo’s culminating night on Saturday, Dec. 13.

Three-time and reigning World Champion Bareback Rider Kaycee Feild is the face of the program in ProRodeo, donating his time to the cause while wearing a Wrangler National Patriot patch on his shirt and taking trips to places like Afghanistan to visit U.S. troops. I talked to Feild on Memorial Day while he was waiting to catch a flight in Alaska, where he was halfway through a two-week trek to meet members of the U.S. Coast Guard stationed throughout the massive state.

Kaycee Field, shown here posing with his RAM Truck Top Gun Award truck in 2011 while wearing a Wrangler National Patriot patch on his shirt, is committed to giving back to the country’s soldiers.

He was excited to have had the chance to meet troops who are dedicated to protecting the American way of life.

“It’s just so humbling to see what our troops go through,” Feild said. “It’s not easy to be away from home and away from your family, and being a rodeo cowboy and having to be away from your family a lot, we can relate to a fraction of that. It’s really humbling to see how well they handle it, their motivation and how they keep doing their jobs the best they can.”

Feild’s Alaskan tour included stops in Dutch Harbor, Homer, Kodiak, Juneau and Sitka. He was thrilled by the experience.

“It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s so beautiful here. It’s really, really unbelievable.”

Feild said the response from the soldiers has been great through the years.

“Everyone of (the soldiers) I’ve run into has been so appreciative of what the Wrangler National Patriot Program is doing,” Feild said. “They thank me for coming over and saying hi, and they’re thankful for seeing a cowboy hat and cowboy boots. It’s pretty inspirational.”

Memorial Day also meant the kickoff of the Old Fort Days Rodeo in Fort Smith, Ark., as it has for the last 81 years. The longstanding PRCA rodeo has a storied history of paying tribute to the country’s military, and beginning on Memorial Day is a sacred thing for the rodeo.

“It’s a big thing for us to honor our military, both those coming and going,” said Rodeo Chairman Ronald Scamardo. “We’re basically a military industrial town, and we’re proud of our history here in Fort Smith.”

The Old Fort Days Rodeo in Fort Smith, Ark., began on Memorial Day for the 82nd consecutive year, and the rodeo's grand entry always includes a lot of red, white and blue.  --Photo by Mark Stallings

The Old Fort Days Rodeo in Fort Smith, Ark., began on Memorial Day for the 82nd consecutive year, and the rodeo’s grand entry always includes a lot of red, white and blue. –Photo by Mark Stallings

The rodeo honored World War II veteran Bennie Rausch on Monday, its Wrangler National Patriot Night, a tribute that those in attendance won’t soon forget. Fort Smith’s history as a military hub also plays a role in the rodeo’s patriotic theme.

“We have a rich history in Fort Smith with Fort Chaffee being a full-time military base and now being a National Guard base,” Scamardo said. “The original fort during the Civil War days was called Fort Smith, so we have a lot of history and a big contingent of soldiers who have come through here from other states.”

Last year, I had the pleasure of writing about the beautiful and talented Jenna Smeenk, who was simultaneously serving in the United States Air Force and in the role of Miss Rodeo Florida. Smeenk is a great example of ProRodeo’s commitment to the U.S. Armed Forces, and I was honored to tell her story.

Jenna Smeenk simultaneously served as Miss Rodeo Florida last year while also serving in the U.S. Air Force.  --Ron Mandes photo

Jenna Smeenk simultaneously served as Miss Rodeo Florida last year while also serving in the U.S. Air Force. –Ron Mandes photo

Those are just a few examples of how red, white and blue runs deeply through the sport, how it is ingrained in the fabric of the Western way of life. When I think of occasions like Memorial Day, where we pay tribute to our fallen heroes, I think about my grandfathers and the multitude of others who have served in the Armed Forces through the years.

Filled with a sense of pride, two words keep coming to mind: “Thank you.”

Kimzey keeps rolling, widens world standings lead

Sage Kimzey’s hot start has blossomed into a breakout season this year.

The 19-year-old from Strong City, Okla., blazed through April and into May, picking up big checks along the way to widen his world standings lead over four-time and reigning World Champion J.W. Harris. Kimzey split first with Jason Beck at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo with a 92-pointer on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Line Man, and also won the Chisholm Trail Stampede in Duncan, Okla., with a 91 aboard Rafter H Rodeo’s Seeing Red the same week.

Kimzey enjoyed his ride aboard Line Man.

“I’ve actually seen him around a bunch, so I knew he was a good bull,” said Kimzey, who is looking for his first career Wrangler National Finals Rodeo berth. “He went to the right and was into my hand, so it worked out pretty good. Whenever I got my draws for that weekend, I knew there were going to be some chances for some big scores and hopefully a couple wins, and that’s what happened.”

World Standings leader Sage Kimzey split first place at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo with this 92-pointer on Carr Pro Rodeo's Line Man.  --Photo courtesy of Robby Freeman

World Standings leader Sage Kimzey split first place at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo with this 92-pointer on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Line Man. –Photo courtesy of Robby Freeman

The Duncan victory wasn’t Kimzey’s first triumph on Seeing Red.

“I actually won Hill City, Kan., on him last year,” he said. “I knew he was going to be really good too, and if I could ride him for eight seconds, I knew I’d have a chance to win that one, too.”

Those two finishes added $4,185 to his pocket and helped push his season earnings to $79,883 through mid-May, further delighting the talented teen.

“The last month was awesome,” he said. “Everything’s still clicking the way it has been all year, so I couldn’t be more happy with it. I’m healthy, and everything’s going perfectly right now.”

He preceded that week with a tie for third at the Buc Days ProRodeo in Corpus Christi, Texas, with an 89 on Frontier Rodeo’s Jumping Jack, and he also picked up a check at the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Guthrie, Okla. The score in Corpus Christi was a nice surprise for Kimzey.

“He actually exceeded my expectations,” he said. “I saw my traveling partner, Garrett Smith, get on him in Montgomery, Ala., so I knew there was a chance for a big score there.”

Sage Kimzey

Sage Kimzey

As of May 19, Kimzey led Harris by $17,203 in the world standings. He has a full summer schedule planned and is having the time of his life hitting the rodeo trail hard.

“I couldn’t be looking toward the summer run more or be more happy with how my season’s been so far,” Kimzey said. “June and July are going to be absolutely crazy, and we’re going to try and go to as many as we can and try to qualify for the NFR.

“There’s no better life to live than living the rodeo life on the road. Experiencing everything at such a young age, it’s crazy and is the most fun life I could imagine.”

 

This is the second in a series of monthly articles featuring Sage Kimzey and his path toward the Wrangler NFR. Each month, NFR Insider Neal Reid will catch up with Kimzey to talk about his progress, successes and setbacks as the rodeo season marches on. Stay tuned for more about Kimzey.